adys’s page

August 28, 2009

Filed under: 1 — bhya @ 4:39 am

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April 29, 2008

Lyrics of the day

Filed under: Favorit Ku, Music of my life, My Concern, True Love ... — bhya @ 9:36 am

AGAIN

I’ve been searching for you
I heard a cry within my soul
I never had a yearning quite like this before
Now that you are walking right through my door
All of my life
Where have you been
I wonder if Ill ever see you again
And if that day comes
I know we could win
I wonder if Ill ever see you again
A sacred gift of heaven
For better worse wherever
And I would never let somebody break you down
Or take your crown, never
All of my life
Where have you been
I wonder if Ill ever see you again
And if that day comes
I know we could win
I wonder if Ill ever see you again
Ive searched through time, Ive always known
That you where there, upon your throne
A lonely queen, without her king
Ive longed for you, my love forever
All of my life
Where have you been
I wonder if Ill ever see you again
And if that day comes
I know we could win
I wonder if Ill ever see you again
All of my life
Where have you been
I wonder if Ill ever see you again
And if that day comes
I know we could win
I wonder if Ill ever see you again
All of my life
Where have you been
I wonder if Ill ever see you again
And if that day comes
I know we could win
I wonder if Ill ever see you again

I wonder if Ill ever see you again
I wonder if Ill ever see you again
I wonder if Ill ever see you again
I wonder if Ill ever see you again

I wonder if Ill ever see you again
I wonder if Ill ever see you again
I wonder if Ill ever see you again

April 28, 2008

Mushrooms Varieties

Filed under: Foodie, Glossary — bhya @ 11:23 am

White Variety

White button. The most popular mushroom, white buttons represent about 90 percent of mushrooms consumed in the United States.

Taste. They have a fairly mild taste and blend well with almost anything. Their flavor intensifies when cooked.

Preparation. They can be sautéed or cooked any way or enjoyed raw in salads.

Uses. Try them sliced and sautéed on pizza, in pasta, quesadillas or cheeseburgers.

Nutrition. A serving of 4-5 white mushrooms provides 18 calories, 0 grams of fat and 3 grams of carbohydrates, yet is a good source of the antioxidant selenium; B vitamins riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid; and copper. And, mushrooms have close to 300 mg of potassium per serving, an important nutrient that many Americans do not get enough of. White buttons also contain 2.8 mg of the antioxidant ergothioneine and 15 IU of vitamin D.

crimini variety

Crimini. Also known as baby ‘bellas or browns, criminis are similar in appearance to whites, but have a light-tan to rich-brown cap and a firmer texture.

Flavor. Criminis have a deeper, earthier flavor than whites.

Preparation. Sauté, broil, microwave or cook almost any way.

Uses. Their hearty, full-bodied taste makes them an excellent addition to beef, wild game and vegetable dishes.

Nutrition. A serving of 4-5 crimini mushrooms provides 23 calories, 0 grams of fat and 4 grams of carbohydrates, yet is an excellent source of the antioxidant selenium, the B vitamin riboflavin and copper; and a good source of potassium, phosphorus and B vitamins niacin and pantothenic acid. Criminis also contain 4.9 mg of the antioxidant ergothioneine.

portobello variety

Portabella. A larger relative of criminis, Portabellas have tan or brown caps and measure up to 6 inches in diameter.

Flavor. They have a deep, meat-like texture and flavor.

Preparation. Portabellas can be grilled, broiled or roasted and served as appetizers, entrees or side dishes.

Uses. Their hearty taste and texture makes them a flavorful vegetarian alternative – grill and serve them as “burgers” on toasted buns.

Nutrition. One medium Portabella cap provides 22 calories, 0 grams of fat and 4 grams of carbohydrates, yet it is an excellent source of the B vitamin riboflavin; and a good source of the antioxidant selenium, potassium, phosphorus, the B vitamins niacin and pantothenic acid and copper. Portabellas also contain 4.3 mg of the antioxidant ergothioneine.

to be continued….

thanks to :

http://www.mushroomcouncil.com

I (‘v’) mushrooms

Filed under: Foodie, Glossary — bhya @ 11:15 am

Mention “Mushrooms” and What Comes to Mind? Most likely, their fabulous taste and texture. But there’s more to mushrooms than the pleasure of sitting down to a meaty Portabella sandwich, a mixed-mushroom omelet or a steak topped with sautéed white mushrooms. These oh-so-edible fungi also deserve attention for their unique contributions to a healthful diet.

Unearthing Mushrooms’ Nutritional Treasures. Often grouped with vegetables, mushrooms provide many of the nutritional attributes of produce, as well as attributes more commonly found in meat, beans or grains1. Mushrooms are low in calories, fat-free, cholesterol-free and very low in sodium, yet they provide several nutrients, including riboflavin, niacin and selenium, which are typically found in animal foods or grains1,2. Click here to see how the nutrients in mushrooms compare with those in broccoli, carrots and tomatoes.

The Vitamin D Download Mushrooms are the only natural fresh vegetable or fruit with vitamin D; a serving of 4-5 white button mushrooms provides 15 IU. Preliminary research suggests that the ultraviolet light found in sunlight may boost levels of vitamin D in mushrooms. The natural process of “enriching” mushrooms by briefly exposing mushrooms grown in the dark to light for 5 minutes may boost existing vitamin D levels from 15 IU (4 percent of Daily Value) to as much as 100 percent of the Daily Value (400 IU). Currently, the industry is investigating ways to make mushrooms enriched with vitamin D through light enhancement commercially available. Click here for more information on this research.

What the Science Says About Mushrooms’ Health Benefits. For thousands of years, Eastern cultures have revered mushrooms’ health benefits3. Studies conducted over the past two decades—mostly in Asia—have suggested mushrooms or substances in mushrooms may aid the immune system4. Traditionally, most of this science has focused on shiitake and maitake mushrooms.

Read on to learn more about the minerals, vitamins and natural antioxidants mushrooms offer, or click here for a list of existing research on the nutrients in mushrooms and how they may help in disease prevention.

This research is just the beginning of what is sure to be an exciting journey into a fuller understanding of mushrooms and your health!

Minerals in Mushrooms. The focus on the nutritional value of brightly colored fruits and vegetables has unintentionally left mushrooms in the dark. Mushrooms provide a similar number of nutrients as brightly colored fruits and vegetables.

  • Selenium is a mineral that works as an antioxidant to protect body cells from damage that might lead to heart disease, some cancers and other diseases of aging5. It also has been found to be important for the immune system and fertility in men6. Many foods of animal origin and grains are good sources of selenium, but mushrooms are among the richest sources of selenium in the produce aisle and provide 8-22 mcg per serving1. This is good news for vegetarians, whose sources of selenium are limited.
  • Ergothioneine is a naturally occurring antioxidant that also may help protect the body’s cells. Mushrooms provide 2.8-4.9 mg of ergothioneine per serving of white, Portabella or crimini mushrooms7.
  • Copper helps make red blood cells, which carry oxygen throughout the body. Copper also helps keep bones and nerves healthy1,2,5.
  • Potassium is an important mineral many people do not get enough of. It aids in the maintenance of normal fluid and mineral balance, which helps control blood pressure. It also plays a role in making sure nerves and muscles, including the heart, function properly. Mushrooms have 267- 407 mg of potassium per serving, which is 9 percent of the Daily Value 1,2,5,8.

Vitamins in Mushrooms. Mushrooms are one of the few natural sources of vitamin D, which is essential for healthy bones and teeth. One serving of 4-5 mushrooms provides 15 IU of this important nutrient, which many people do not get enough of1,2. Factors affecting your vitamin D intake include your age, skin color, where you live and whether you use sunscreen or not8,9,11. Mushrooms are also a good source of the B vitamins riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3) and pantothenic acid (B5). These vitamins help break down proteins, fats and carbohydrates so they can be used for energy1,5. Mushrooms can be an important source of B-vitamins for people who don’t eat meat. One serving of crimini mushrooms provides nearly one-quarter of the Daily Value for riboflavin, and mushrooms are one of the best plant-based sources of niacin around1,2.

Mushrooms are also a good source of the B vitamins riboflavin (B2), niacin (B3) and pantothenic acid (B5). These vitamins help break down proteins, fats and carbohydrates so they can be used for energy1,5.

Mushrooms can be an important source of B-vitamins for people who don’t eat meat. One serving of crimini mushrooms provides nearly one-quarter of the Daily Value for riboflavin, and mushrooms are one of the best plant-based sources of niacin around1,2.

  • Pantothenic acid helps with the production of hormones and also plays an important role in the nervous system5.
  • Riboflavin helps maintain healthy red blood cells5.
  • Niacin promotes healthy skin and makes sure the digestive and nervous systems function properly5.

References

1 U.S. Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service. 2006. USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20. Nutrient Data Laboratory Home Page, http://www.ars.usda.gov/ba/bhnrc/ndl

2 U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Center for Food Safety & Applied Nutrition. A Food Labeling Guide. September, 1994 (Editorial revisions, June, 1999) http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/~dms/flg-toc.html

3 Chang R. Functional Properties of Edible Mushrooms. Nutrition Reviews. 1996; 54:91-93

4 Borchers AT, et al. Mushrooms, Tumors, and Immunity: An Update. Experimental Biology and Medicine, 2004:393-406.

5 Duyff, R. American Dietetic Association’s Complete Food and Nutrition Guide. Third addition. Wiley & Sons. NJ. 2006.

6 National Institutes of Health. Medline Plus. http://www.nlm.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002414.htm

7 Dubost, N. J., et al. (2006). Identification and quantification of ergothioneine in cultivated mushrooms by liquid chromatography-mass spectroscopy. International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms, 8, 215-22.

8 U.S. Department of Agriculture and U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Dietary Guidelines for Americans 2005. Chapter 2. http://www.health.gov/dietaryguidelines/dga2005/document/html/chapter2.htm

THANKS TO :

http://www.mushroomcouncil.com

Filed under: 1 — bhya @ 11:02 am

Men look for a woman who is….

Filed under: 1 — bhya @ 3:36 am

According to a survey by singles magazine, these are the top ten attributes that men and women look for in each other, in order of priority.

Men look for woman who is :

  • attractive
  • sincere
  • slim
  • a non-smoker
  • with a sense of humour
  • affectionate
  • tall
  • kind

Women look for a man who is :

  • tall
  • professional
  • with a sense of humour
  • attractive (not necessarily handsome)
  • sincere
  • intelligent
  • handsome
  • kind
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